Solör Bioenergi takes delivery of third Againity ORC turbine

In Sweden, Solör Bioenergi, part of renewable energy provider Solör Bioenergy Group has taken delivery of its third Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) turbine from compatriot Againity AB, this time at its Svenljunga biomass-fired district heat plant. The “Plug’n’Play” installation will turn the facility into a combined heat and power (CHP) plant enabling it to become self-sufficient in electricity. The turbine converts hot water from district heating production into electricity.

A leading player in renewable energy based on wood fuels, Solör Bioenergy Group has operations in 147 locations, primarily in Sweden and Norway, producing and distributing district heating, steam and electricity to homes, companies, public enterprises, and industries.

The district heating plant in Svenljunga has been running since the beginning of the 1980s and has been operated by Solör Bioenergi since 2011. The plant has a biomass boiler that annually produces approximately 45 GWh of district heating from recycled wood.

Increasing efficiencies and reducing losses

Energy efficiency is an important part of Solör Bioenergi’s work and the company works continuously to save energy in the facilities by increasing efficiencies and reducing losses.

The installation of the ORC turbine is a fantastic step in the right direction for Solör Bioenergi, which works for climate-smart solutions. In addition to the fact that we will be self-sufficient in electricity, we also have the opportunity to sell some of the electricity, said Nicklas Eld, Regional Manager Solör Bioenergi Väst.

In a typical conventional power plant, water is converted into steam to drive a steam turbine in order to generate electricity. The ORC turbine being installed from Againity uses hot water from the district heating plant’s hot water system instead to generate power.

The ORC turbine is the third installation of a power turbine within Solör Bioenergi’s district heating operations. The first ORC turbine was installed two years ago at Solör Bioenergi’s district heating plant in Hörby, southern Sweden. The second ORC installation is also underway, at a district heat plant in Vilhelmina in northern Sweden.

Generating electricity for self-consumption is climate-friendly in at least two ways; we relieve the grid in the place we operate and thus benefit the general electrification of society. In addition, we buy less electricity than before, which is a clear energy efficiency improvement, remarked Anders Pettersson, CEO of Solör Bioenergi Fjärrvärme AB.